This is the last of a three-part essay by Canadian sustainability strategist, Brad Zarnett. The series explores why corporate sustainability was always ill-suited to deliver on its promise of a more sustainable world and what we need to do going

Limiting communication, modifying findings, restricting funding and self-censorship for fear of punishment are some examples of science suppression. These dangerous yet prolific acts occur to the benefit of some but at the expense of everyone — especially the environment.  A recent

Joe Biden’s victory in the U.S. presidential election offers new hope in the fight against climate change, both within U.S. borders and around the globe. During his first speech as president-elect, Biden committed to restore the United States’ standing in

While a recent amendment on fossil fuel investments is a promising sign that a modernized Energy Charter Treaty (ECT) could spur more ambitious climate action, governments must consider alternative paths toward this goal. On Wednesday 7 October, EU parliamentarians finalized their negotiating mandate

This is the second of a three-part essay by Canadian sustainability strategist, Brad Zarnett. The series explores why corporate sustainability was always ill-suited to deliver on its promise of a more sustainable world and what we need to do going

From 2015 to 2020, 33 major European based Financial Institutions invested a combined total of 20 billion US$ in companies directly linked to climate-changing deforestation in Brazil. Unless Financial Institutions urgently address their role in funding deforestation, the Amazon and

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